Frost on the pumpkin. It’s Soup Season.

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I turned on the heat this morning.

I woke up to Jack Frost waiting outside my front door.  He was dusting the grass and fallen leaves in frosty jewels in the dusk of early morning.  An iridescence met my eyes as an early morning traveler’s headlights danced across the minute ice crystals blanketing each bland of grass.  I could just make out Jack Frost’s shape as he leapt over the grass and scurried under the new fallen leaves.  He seemed to be searching for something.  Perhaps a forgotten nut that the squirrels had left behind or a hidden gate that opened to a autumn pumpkin patch so he could paint their skin in frosty white splendor.  It was a cold morning.  Time for a hot cup of coffee to warm my stomach and start my day.

As soon as I finished the coffee I hopped on my bike.  Off to the farmer’s market to get some fresh vegetables.  The thought of soup simmering on the stove kept me warm as I rode through the cold streets.  A leek, some mushrooms and sweet carrots would be a nice start to the soup.  After chatting with one of the farmers at the market I purchased a leek, some red carrots,  some potatoes, a watermelon radish and some delicious looking red raspberries.  I hopped back on my bike and soon I was at home brushing away the cold of the morning.

The potatoes will be put into short storage toe be used in the coming weeks.  Potatoes, onions, beets, carrots, etc. cane be stored long term.  Just follow the link to a detailed winter produce storage site.

The Radish is a treat for me.  I slice it up and pickle it.  Yummy on sandwiches and great on salads or just to munch on.

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Pickled Watermelon Radishes

1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup water
1/4 tsp sea salt
1 cup watermelon radish sliced
2 tbsp sugar

Heat the fist four ingredients together until the sugar dissolves completely.  Refrigerate until cool.  Place the sliced radishes in a bowl and pour the two tbsp sugar over them.  Gently massage the radishes.  That’s right.  They have had a long hard season in the garden.  Actually, the sugar will pull some of the excess water from the radishes.  Drain the excess water from the bowl and rinse the radishes.  Put into a jar and fill with the cooled vinegar sugar mixture.  Cover and store in your refrigerator.

The leek will be for the soup.  I like soup on a cold day and this recipe is one of my favorites.  There are two versions to this soup.  The first is made with turkey the second is made without.  Either is delicious.

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Wild Rice with Leek and Mushroom Soup

2 tbsp olive oil
1 leek sliced
2 carrots sliced thin
2 cups portabella mushrooms sliced
3 cloves garlic minced
small bunch of sage chopped (choose the amount you would like for flavor)
1 tsp sea salt
2 cups of water
3 cups of vegetable broth (turkey broth if you are making the non-vegan version)
1/2 dry vermouth
1/2 cup brown rice
1/2 cup wild rice
3 cups water
1/2 cup rolled oats

(for non-vegan version 1 cup  chopped turkey and substitute three cups evaporated milk for the 3 cups water and 1/2 cup rolled oats)

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Saute the leeks, carrots, mushrooms, and garlic until the leeks are tender.  Add dry vermouth, sage and salt.  Cook for two more minutes.  Add water, broth, brown rice and wild rice.  Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer.  Cook for 90 minutes or until rice is tender.  Add three cups of water and 1/2 cup of rolled oats to a blender.  Blend until smooth.  Add to soup and bring to a boil.  Remove from heat.  Add more salt if needed.  I like to serve this with crusty bread to dip into the soup.  Also great over roasted potatoes.

Raspberries.  What am I to do with the raspberries.  They are going to make a wonderful dessert.

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Raspberries and biscuits.

In a large bowl, combine 1.5 cups  flour, 2 tbsp brown sugar, 1.5 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp salt.  Cut in 12 tbsp butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add 1/4 cup plus 2 tbsp cream and stir until the dough is evenly moistened. With a large spoon, scoop the dough into 8 loose mounds and place on a wax paper–lined baking sheet.

In a large, deep, ovenproof saute pan, combine 3/4 cup of granulated sugar with 2 cups raspberries, 1 tbsp lemon zest, a cinnamon stick and 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer stirring occasionally, 10 minutes.

Arrange the dough on top of the berry sauce.  Cover and simmer over very low heat until the biscuits are springy and cooked through, 15 minutes.  Sprinkle the biscuits with granulated sugar, cinnamon and broil for 5 minutes until the biscuits are lightly browned.  Serve with whipped cream or ice cream.  The biscuits are soft and compliment the berries.

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WHEN THE FROST IS ON THE PUMPKIN

When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock,
And you hear the kyouck and gobble of the struttin’ turkey-cock,
And the clackin’ of the guineys, and the cluckin’ of the hens,
And the rooster’s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence;
O, it’s then’s the times a feller is a-feelin’ at his best,
With the risin’ sun to greet him from a night of peaceful rest,
As he leaves the house, bareheaded, and goes out to feed the stock,
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.

They’s something kind o’ harty-like about the atmusfere
When the heat of summer’s over and the coolin’ fall is here —
Of course we miss the flowers, and the blossums on the trees,
And the mumble of the hummin’-birds and buzzin’ of the bees;
But the air’s so appetizin’, and the landscape through the haze
Of a crisp and sunny morning of the airly autumn days
Is a pictur’ that no painter has the colorin’ to mock —
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.

The husky, rusty russel of the tossels of the corn,
And the raspin’ of the tangled leaves, as golden as the morn;
The stubble in the furries — kind o’ lonesome-like, but still
A-preachin’ sermuns to us of the barns they growed to fill;
The straw-stack in the medder, and the reaper in the shed;
The hosses in theyr stalls below — the clover over-head, —
O, it sets my hart a-clickin’ like the tickin’ of a clock,
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock!

Then your apples all is gethered, and the ones a feller keeps
Is poured around the celler-floor in red and yeller heaps;
And your cider-makin’ ‘s over, and your wimmern-folks is through
With their mince and apple-butter, and theyr souse and saussage, too! …
I don’t know how to tell it — but ef sich a thing could be
As the Angels wantin’ boardin’, and they’d call around on me —
I’d want to ‘commodate ’em — all the whole-indurin’ flock —
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock!

By James Whitcomb Riley

Cheers

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